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Purpose of No Probe Top and DFA Top

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ANANDT View Drop Down
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    Posted: 27 Jun 2022 at 9:13pm
Hi,

I'm currently working with Allegro, please explain the purpose of No probe TOP why do we need to add one for our footprint. 

Next if we create a standard footprint using Allegro Footprint wizard it creates Place Bound Top along with DFA Top how one differs from another and purpose of it. 

Please explain.

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Tom H View Drop Down
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Post Options Post Options   Thanks (0) Thanks(0)   Quote Tom H Quote  Post ReplyReply Direct Link To This Post Posted: 28 Jun 2022 at 8:35am
I'm not an expert on the Allegro CAD tool, but I am familiar with the terms. 

You would use a "No probe TOP" feature if you're using Test Points. They cannot be placed under a footprint because they need to be Probed. The No probe TOP feature throws a DRC error if a Test Point is in the No Probe area. Also, Allegro has a feature for auto-placing test points. That feature will avoid all No probe TOP areas. 

Place Bound Top is used to establish a part placement area. You set spacing rules for each component footprint. If you violate the Place Bound spacing rules Allegro throws a DRC error. Other CAD tools that have less features use a Placement Courtyard boundary outline as a guide for part placement. 

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